Flooding/landslides in south western Japan – message for Hugo

Hugo

I have been monitoring the news reports from Japan since the end of last week.  I and others here are very concerned about the ongoing reports about the shocking levels of rainfall, consequential flooding and landslides and resultant loss of life, centred primarily on Hiroshima Prefecture.

I remember the the last, more serious, set of landslides centred on Hiroshima city itself about which I posted extensively in August 2014 – a month that retains the record for the single largest monthly total of posts on this blog – which prompted me to contact the British Embassy in Japan to check on your welfare.

This time, it seems that it has been the wider prefecture rather than the city itself that has borne the brunt and I hope and pray that you are safe and well and have not been placed anywhere near harm’s way.  I will continue to monitor what is going on there and my thoughts remains with you as, of course, they always are irrespective of events such as these.

Daddy

[UPDATE, 13 JULY 2018, 1.05pm GMT:  I received an email from a Pro Consul at the British Embassy overnight, having contacted both your mother and, after not receiving a response from her the British Embassy in Tokyo, after posting the above message.  The Pro Consul confirmed that you are well; your mother also sent me an email after becoming aware of attempts by the Embassy to contact her via your maternal grandparents.  I am just happy that you are safe and well given what has happened in Japan.  I will post a further message to you and send some stuff to you later in the summer.]

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Snow in London

Hello Hugo

You turn nine and a quarter today.  It snowed overnight in London – the weather in the UK is very bad this week.  I went out early and took some photographs of the snow for you – please see below.  I am going up to see Grandad on Friday evening; I’m taking a plane up to Newcastle and am hoping that the flight is not cancelled because of the bad weather.

Hope you are keeping well.

 

End of summer 2017 message

Hello Hugo

Another summer ends.  Your 6th in Japan in a row.  It’ll soon start cooling down again so no more sweltering walks to the station/school until 2018.

Here is a short UK update for you.

Today marks the 20th anniversary of the death of Diana Princess of Wales; it made news around the world at the time and there has been a lot in the media over it this summer.  I clearly remember when I found out; I was back home in Everton for the summer after the end of my first year at university.  My mum told me in the kitchen when I went down to make coffee.

As I posted yesterday, our Prime Minister is currently on a trade mission to Japan.  My repeated requests to the Foreign Office in the UK to lobby the Japanese government much harder and more publicly on the issue of parental child abduction have not to date been heeded and I fear that such issues will not be on Mrs May’s delegation’s visit.  As such I yesterday put in a freedom of information request to find out why this continues to be the case and when this will change.  I will update the blog in the coming weeks as soon as I receive a response.

I spent a couple of days with Dad up in Edinburgh, Scotland, over the late August national holiday. It is a fantastically beautiful city also with much on offer around it in the surrounding, mountainous countryside.  We concentrated mainly on the city centre but did manage to get the bus out to the Royal Yacht Britannia now moored in Leith, a coastal suburb of Edinburgh.

Dad celebrates his 89th birthday next month and everyone is meeting up, as we did last year, at the Boathouse down in Hythe to mark the occasion.  Plans are also being tentatively developed for his 90th birthday in 2018.

Less positively, both my aunt Diana and your Great Grandma have recently been diagnosed with cancers.  Diana is responding very well to treatment as it was caught early – she is expected to make a full recovery – but Grandma is still waiting for a full medical assessment.

Your UK cousin, Olly, is doing well.  He celebrated his first birthday in April and my sister returned to work at about the same time.

I have mailed you the items below in two tranches, one today and one on 24 August.  These include a genuine Edinburgh/Cashmere scarf – I tried it on before sending it to you and it is very soft and fluffy and will, I trust, help keep you warm this winter.

North Korean missile test

Hello Hugo

I have just seen in the news that North Korea has launched a missile over Hokkaido and not just into the Sea of Japan as had hitherto tended to be its habit.  It is leading the news on the BBC.  Although the incident was thankfully some way north of you, it must be a worry for you as it is very much for me as there is no guessing what this evil and arbitrary regime may do next or when.

The last time that there was an incident of this magnitude was in 2009; the launch then coincided with a flight that I took from Narita to London having spent a holiday with you and your mother in Japan (you stayed on 3 months longer before coming back to the UK – I had to return to work).  I will try and post some photos below of us together on that visit later today or later this week as I do not have access to them at this moment.  Anyway my thoughts and prayers are with you at this time – as they are always.

Daddy

Judge writes personal letter to teen after High Court battle

BBC

Judge writes personal letter to teen after High Court battleAn envelopeImage copyright

A judge has written a personal letter to a 14-year-old boy explaining why he has rejected his request to move with his father to Scandinavia.

Mr Justice Jackson said he felt the teenager had brought the case to the High Court “as a way of showing your dad how much you love him”.

He told the boy he was “doing well in life” and did not believe that the move abroad would work.

He said: “I am confident that it is the right order for you in the long run.”

Mr Justice Jackson, who is based in the Family Division of the High Court in London, wrote the letter to the teenager which laid down his ruling after a hearing in July.

Sam, not his real name, had applied for permission to live with his father in a Scandinavian country, which his mother and step-father opposed.

The application was later taken over by his dad.

‘Duty by your dad’

In the letter, the judge told the boy he believed “that your feelings are that you love everyone in your family very much, just as they love you”.

However, he noted that Sam’s parents had “very different personalities” and the fact they found it hard to agree was “stressful for you”.

In the letter, the judge said he found Sam’s dad to be someone who was “troubled” and had a “lot of influence over you”.

“All fathers influence their sons, but your father goes a lot further than that. I’m quite clear that if he was happy with the present arrangements, you probably would be too. Because he isn’t, you aren’t.”

He questioned whether the idea for the proceedings came from Sam or his dad and said he believed the teenager had “brought the proceedings mainly as a way of showing your dad how much you love him”.

‘Lost sight’

He told the teenager: “Also, I may be wrong, but when you gave your evidence I didn’t get the feeling that you actually see your future in Scandinavia at all.

“Instead, what I saw was you doing your duty by your dad while trying not to be too unfair to your mum. But you still felt you had to boost your dad wherever you could.

“That’s how subtle and not-so-subtle pressure works. So I respect your views, but I don’t take them at face value because I think they are significantly formed by your loyalty to your father.”

The judge said Sam’s dad had a “manipulative side” and has “in some ways lost sight of what was best” for his son.

He told the boy he had no confidence that a move to Scandinavia would work and hoped his dad would decide to stay in England “for your sake”.

‘Justice was done’

The judge said the evidence showed Sam was doing well in life in England and that he “should make the most of the many opportunities that life here has to offer you”.

He went on: “If, when you finish your A-levels, you want to move to Scandinavia, you will be 18 and an adult – it will be up to you.”

Mr Justice Jackson dismissed his dad’s application to take Sam to live in Scandinavia and for Sam to apply for citizenship there.

He ruled that Sam would have contact with his dad on alternate weekends and any arrangement after he moved to Scandinavia alone would have to be agreed between both parents.

In the letter, he added: “Whatever each of your parents might think about it, I hope they have the dignity not to impose their views on you, so that you can work things out for yourself.”

The judge finished by saying he and Sam’s dad had enjoyed finding out they loved the film My Cousin Vinny – but for different reasons.

“He mentioned it as an example of a miscarriage of justice, while I remember it for the best courtroom scenes in any film, and the fact that justice was done in the end.”

Source:  “Judge writes personal letter to teen after High Court battle”, BBC News, 27 July 2017