Prime Minister visits Japan

Foreign &
Commonwealth
Office

Press release

PM heads to Japan to build strong post-Brexit relationship with Tokyo

The Prime Minister begins a new era of strengthening Britain’s ties and influence in Asia with an ambitious three-day trip to Japan.

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Hiroshima landslide – 3 years on

The article that appeared below yesterday about the third anniversary of the Hiroshima landslide – I posted a series of posts about it in August 2014 (which still holds the record for the largest number of posts in any one month) – was a reminder that it has been almost 3 years since I received any real news about my son.  It is preposterous that this is so and that the UK government shows no tangible interest in the issue of ongoing and historical international parental child abduction in Japan.

Hiroshima remembers victims of deadly landslides on third anniversary of the disaster

KYODO

A memorial service was held Sunday in Hiroshima to commemorate the third anniversary of the landslides that claimed the lives of 77 people.

“I don’t want anyone else to become a victim or a person feeling like us,” said 77-year-old Takako Miyamoto, one of the speakers at the event. She lost her husband after torrential rain triggered landslides in residential areas close to mountains in the city early on Aug. 20, 2014.

“It is really painful and sad. Our lives were ruined after losing everything dear to us, homes destroyed,” said Miyamoto, who was seriously injured in the landslide.

Touching on recent natural disasters including the torrential rain in Kyushu last month, she said she “sincerely hopes that no one else dies in a disaster.”

Three years ago, about 400 houses were either washed away or damaged by the landslides that struck Hiroshima.

“Residents are providing mutual support and the work to protect each other has progressed,” Hiroshima Mayor Kazumi Matsui said at the ceremony. “We’d like to support these efforts.”

Jointly hosted by the Hiroshima municipal and prefectural governments, the event was held in Asakita Ward, one of the hardest-hit areas.

Families and residents visited the devastated sites early Sunday to offer flowers and pray for those who died. Some touched the names of victims listed on a monument, while others tearfully clasped hands.

Hina Sawamoto, a 16-year-old high school student in the city of Hiroshima, lost her grandmother after a mudslide smashed into her house that day. She sometimes recalls the mudslide when it rains heavily and becomes worried that disaster may strike again.

The teenager said she wants to give a helping hand to those affected by the downpours in Kyushu, just as she was helped by volunteers after the disaster in Hiroshima.

She went to Oita Prefecture last month with her father, Yasuhiro, 46, and helped a family whose house had been swept away by a mudslide. “I was supported by many people. So I wanted to show my gratitude,” she said.

Although she was helping out, Sawamoto said she did not really get to talk with the victims. “Sometimes people want to be left alone. I know how they were feeling.” At the time of the disaster, residents in the devastated area had not been informed of the landslide risk, as many of the sites were not designated within the warning zone in accordance with the law on prevention of landslide disasters.

Afterward, the state revised the law and obliged prefectural governments to swiftly make public the results of basic investigations of terrain and geological conditions. The revised law took effect in January 2015.

According to the Hiroshima Prefectural Government, emergency work since the disaster to make 57 locations more resistant to landslides was completed in May this year.

The prefecture is expected to designate around 50,000 locations as landslide warning zones, but only about 40 percent of the areas had been so designated as of Aug. 10.

Source:  “Hiroshima remembers victims of deadly landslides on third anniversary of disaster”, The Japan Times, 20 August 2017

UK Foreign Secretary in Japan

Again, and as highlighted by me in the past, there has been a further high level visit by our Foreign Secretary to Japan and despite all the larking about, the issue of international parental child abduction continues to be off the Foreign Office’s agenda despite Japan’s continued failings.  There is hardly a better person in contemporary UK politics to ratchet up awareness of an issue of such importance and, yet again, Foreign Office officials have failed to brief a Foreign Secretary on it:

The Telegraph

From Maybot to robot: Boris Johnson meets face of state-of-the-art technology on visit to Japan

Boris Johnson has worked alongside the Maybot – the rather unflattering nickname given to the Prime Minister – so he seemed completely at ease trying out his oratory skills on a state-of-the-art robot on a diplomatic visit to Japan. The robot, however, looked hard to impress.

The Foreign Secretary touched down on Thursday for top-level cyber security, defence and trade talks.

He stopped for a photo opportunity with a humanoid robot at the Research Institute for Science and Engineering in Tokyo.

Boris Johnson interacted with a robot in Japan
Boris Johnson interacted with a robot in Japan CREDIT: AP PHOTO/EUGENE HOSHIKO, POOL

 He shook hands with the robot, named Wabian2, before striking a series of poses.

The robots he saw were developed to help in disaster situations and with healthcare.

The Foreign Secretary said: “I have come to Japan to build on our historic relationship, which is based on common values, support for democracy, human rights and free and open markets.

AP Photo/Eugene Hoshiko, Pool
CREDIT: AP PHOTO/EUGENE HOSHIKO, POOL

“Japanese companies invest more than £40 billion in the UK and our commercial relationship is stronger than ever. We do great work together on everything from defence and security to education, research and innovation.

“As London Mayor I had the privilege and honour to see up close how dramatically the Olympic and Paralympic Games unified and lifted our great capital, and I am excited for the people of Tokyo that they will soon experience the magic that the Olympics brings.

REUTERS/Eugene Hoshiko
CREDIT: REUTERS/EUGENE HOSHIKO

“I’m proud that our world-leading expertise in staging major events will help to forge an even stronger UK-Japan partnership ahead of the 2020 Olympic Games.”Source:  “From Maybot to robot:  Boris Johnson meets face of state-of-the-art technology on visit to Japan, The Telegraph, 20 July 2017 

End of Summer 2016 message

Hello Hugo

So ends another summer, your 5th in Japan, although yours will last well into September.

I shall send you a package shortly to bridge the gap between Children’s Day in Japan and your birthday in November.  I will post photographs below after doing so, either tomorrow or next week – I still have some items to buy.

It has been an eventful summer.  The UK voted for “Brexit” and this month saw the 2016 summer Olympics take place in Rio; the UK took second place in the medal tally, eclipsing even the London Olympics 4 years back.  That success  has been attributed to the (at the time slightly controversial) launch of the National Lottery in 1994 to provide funding for arts, heritage, sport, community projects etc.

I wrote about the London Olympics here, the day after Tokyo was successful in its bid to host the 2020 event.  I have posted this, this and this in relation to the Tokyo Olympics – no doubt there will be more such posts over the next 4 years.   No doubt, also, that the 2020 Games will be one of the key events in your childhood – I well remember the 1988 and 1992 Olympics and, more vaguely, the 1984 ones, all of which took place when I was a boy.  You were born in 2008, itself an Olympic year.

I have had something of an Olympic year myself work-wise but the less said about that the better.  The weather has been nice in London for the most part these past months, including this incredibly hot day in July.

Although I don’t want to say too much here just now so as not to prejudice anything that may happen, there are some signs that the Foreign Office here is beginning to take your situation more seriously, albeit 5 years on from your removal to Japan.  I pray that something concrete will emerge.

summer-2016-1

summer-2016-2

summer-2016-3-receipts

 

Foreign Secretary’s Visit to Hiroshima, Japan

As posted this time last week, our Foreign Secretary, Philip Hammond, is at present in Hiroshima, Japan, the city remembered by all but me for other reasons.  In my case it is the city in the world that has the greatest resonance in my heart because my son is there, abducted from his father.  That much at least I know.

I have not heard from the Foreign Office in response to my email as reproduced in the post of a week back.  Nor was there a response to an earlier email to the Foreign Office – covering similar ground – as far back as 16 August 2014.

The news reports of Mr Hammond’s visit to Japan stress the importance given to security issues.  No one would seek to detract from that.  But I struggle to understand why – as I fear must be the case – Mr Hammond and his officials, even without sight of my email, failed to free up a few moments with the Japanese Foreign Minister to raise the issue of pre-Convention cases of international child abduction.  That is something that should be one of the very few issues of real contention between the UK and Japan, two countries that for a long time have enjoyed a good relationship.  The current UK guidance on parental child abduction to Japan recognises the problem but has nothing to say about the resolution of it. The guidance simply states that:

The Hague Convention cannot be used retrospectively.  If children were taken to Japan before 1 April 2014, left behind parents will be unable to use the UK Convention to return their children to the UK.

So what is the Foreign Office’s answer to this statement of the obvious?  And why was nothing apparently said at this meeting?

The G7/G8 meeting of Foreign Ministers in Hiroshima today – Mr Hammond is sat to the immediate left of US Secretary of State Kerry; source:  Mr Hammond’s Twitter account

Mr Hammond meeting with his Japanese counterpart, Mr Fumio Kishida; again taken from Mr Hammond’s Twitter account

Welcome reception today at the Grand Prince Hotel, Hiroshima; see article on MOFA website here